We have amazing faculty. View the full list below, or use the form to filter the list.


Regular Faculty

Portrait of Greg Amberg

Gregory Amberg, PhD

Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences

Investigation of calcium channel function in arterial smooth muscle, pituitary gonadotropes, and dopaminergic neurons using a combination of patch-clamp electrophysiology, molecular biology and imaging techniques such as total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy.
Gregory.Amberg@colostate.edu

  • Cellular and Molecular

Portrait of Chuck Anderson

Chuck Anderson, PhD

Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences

Deep machine learning applied to biomedical images and signals; electroencephalography (EEG) pattern analysis for brain-computer interfaces, reinforcement learning.
Anderson@cs.colostate.edu

  • Computational

Portrait of Aga Burzynska

Aga Burzynska, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Human Development and Family Studies

Age-related changes in brain structure and function; brain-behavior relationships; cognitive and neural plasticity; lifestyle interventions to improve brain health and cognitive abilities; effects of physical activity and fitness on the aging brain and mind, long-term effects of motor training on the brain (professional dancers and athletes).
Agaburza@colostate.edu

  • Cognitive and Behavioral

Portrait of Soham Chanda

Soham Chanda, PhD

Professor, Department of XYZ

Small amount of text describing research areas. You should be able to copy/paste text here. Including the email address.
Fullname.Email@colostate.edu

  • Cellular and Molecular,
  • Developmental,
  • Neurogeneration and Disease

Portrait of Anne Cleary

Anne Cleary, PhD

Professor, Department of Psychology

Human memory processes, especially those for human recognition memory. Studied primarily through behavioral methods, but also through measurement of brain electrophysiology and functional neuroimaging.
Anne.Cleary@colostate.edu

  • Cognitive and Behavioral

Portrait of Bradley Conner

Bradley Conner, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Psychology

Genetic predictors of personality and engagement in health risk behaviors, including substance use disorders. Structural and functional neuroimaging of impulsivity and sensation seeking.
Brad.Conner@colostate.edu

  • Cognitive and Behavioral

Portrait of Patricia Davies

Patricia Davies, PhD

Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy

Examination of neurophysiological mechanisms that underlie cognitive and motor behaviors in children with and without disabilities using electroencephalography (EEG) and event-related potentials (ERPs). Application of brain computer interfaces for persons who have severe motor disabilities.
Patricia.Davies@colostate.edu

  • Cognitive and Behavioral,
  • Developmental

Portrait of Bruce Draper

Bruce Draper, PhD

Professor, Department of Computer Science

Computer vision; image understanding; computational models of human vision.
Bruce.Draper@colostate.edu

  • Computational

Portrait of Brett Fling

Brett Fling, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Health and Exercise Science

A range of neuroimaging techniques including functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation are used to assess the brain’s sensorimotor system. These approaches are integrated with experimental paradigms assessing movement biomechanics to provide a comprehensive view of the neural control of movement. A specific emphasis is place on individuals with sensorimotor dysfunction such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and mild traumatic brain injury.
Brett.Fling@colostate.edu

  • Cognitive and Behavioral,
  • Neurodegeneration and Disease

Portrait of Deborah Garrity

Deborah Garrity, PhD

Professor, Department of Biology

The molecular and genetic basis of heart development in zebrafish. Manipulating biomechanical forces that impact embryonic cardiac development. Approaches include forward and reverse genetics, transgenic fish, optical tool development, molecular cloning and RNA expression profiling.
Deborah.Garrity@colostate.edu

  • Developmental

Portrait of Shane Hentges

Shane Hentges, PhD

Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences

Cellular physiology and anatomical circuitry underlying the regulation of food intake and reward. Release of rapid transmitters from peptidergic neurons and the regulation of transmitter release by opioids and cannabinoids is studied using combined patch-clamp electrophysiology and labeling techniques.
Shane.Hentges@colostate.edu

  • Cellular and Molecular,
  • Circuits and Systems

Portrait of Fred Hoerndli

Frederick Hoerndli, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences

Investigation of the regulation of Glutamate receptor transport in synaptic function, plasticity and ageing in the model organism C. elegans. We use a combination of molecular biology, genetics, in vivo spinning disk confocal microscopy, microfluidics and behavior analysis to gain mechanistic insights into regulatory mechanisms at the interface of molecular transport and synaptic function.
Frederic.Hoerndli@colostate.edu

  • Cellular and Molecular,
  • Neurodegeneration and Disease

Portrait of Kim Hoke

Kim Hoke, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Biology

Neural systems underlying social behaviors; evolution of behavior; contributions of neuromodulation to context dependence of behaviors; neuroendocrinology; evolution of ear structures and hearing.
Kim.Hoke@colostate.edu

  • Circuits and Systems,
  • Developmental

Portrait of Seonil Kim

Seonil Kim, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences

Synapse structure and function in neurons. The signaling pathways and receptor trafficking mechanisms that control synaptic transmission and synapse strength. Genetically modified mice to study cognitive function and diseases. cell biology, calcium imaging, biochemistry, and behavioral analysis, as well as electrophysiology to deduce molecular mechanisms that control synapses.
Seonil.Kim@colostate.edu

  • Cellular and Molecular,
  • Neurodegeneration and Disease

Portrait of Neha Lodha

Neha Lodha, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Health and Exercise Science & Biomedical Engineering

Neuromuscular mechanisms of impaired motor control in healthy (young and older adults) and diseased populations (stroke and transient ischemic attack). Functional consequences of impaired motor control during activities of daily living such as bimanual gripping, driving, and over-ground walking. Developing rehabilitation protocols for improving motor function.
Neha.Lodha@colostate.edu

  • Circuits and Systems,
  • Neurodegeneration and Disease

Portrait of Emily Merz

Emily Merz, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology

Socioeconomic inequality leads to differences in children’s experiences that impact their growth and development. In the LEARN lab, we study how these experiences may impact the developing brain to better understand ways to support families and communities and reduce the effects of disadvantage. We investigate stress as a mechanism through which socioeconomic disadvantage may impact the developing brain and in turn children’s emotional and cognitive outcomes. Research in the lab also focuses on the factors in children’s lives that promote resilience and testing strategies intended to reduce socioeconomic disparities in children’s health and development.
Emily.Merz@colostate.edu

  • Cognitive and Behavioral,
  • Developmental

Portrait of Brent Myers

Brent Myers, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences

Integrative neuroscience of stress, including behavioral neuroscience, cardiovascular and endocrine physiology, and the neurocircuit basis of stress effects on health. Particularly focused on the corticolimbic mechanisms linking depression and cardiovascular disease. Studies combine optogenetics, fiber photometry, and genetic-based circuit mapping to determine the neural underpinnings of chronic stress-mediated changes in social and motivational behavior assays, ECG radiotelemetry, and plasma hormone analyses.
Brent.Myers@colostate.edu

  • Circuits and Systems

Portrait of Donald Mykles

Donald Mykles, PhD

Professor, Department of Biology

Hormonal regulation of molting, limb regeneration, and skeletal muscle atrophy in decapod crustaceans. Neuropeptide and steroid control of cyclic nucleotide-, nitric oxide-, mTOR-, and TGFbeta-dependent signaling pathways are studied.
Donald.Mykles@colostate.edu

  • Circuits and Systems,
  • Developmental

Portrait of Ashok Prasad

Ashok Prassad, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

Quantitative and predictive models for molecular and cellular biology by using tools and methods from the engineering and physical sciences. We study biophysics of cell shape especially in cancer, mechanical properties of cells, synthetic biology, “big data” methods for cancer diagnosis and therapy, bacterial metabolism and mathematical and computational analysis of intracellular networks. We are also interested in how single cells including neurons do information processing and take decisions.
ashokp@engr.colostate.edu

  • Computational

Portrait of Noreen Reist

Noreen Reist, PhD

Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences
Director of MCIN

Molecular and genetic techniques are used in conjunction with electrophysiology and ultrastructural analysis to determine the molecular mechanisms mediating neurotransmitter release at a living synapse. Studies applied to determine disease etiology in a familial myasthenic syndrome and a spontaneous human mutation resulting in profound cognitive impairment.
Noreen.Reist@colostate.edu

  • Cellular and Molecular

Portrait of Don Rojas

Donald Rojas, PhD

Professor, Department of Psychology

Structural and functional neuroimaging techniques are used to examine sensory and motor processing in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and childhood onset schizophrenia.
Don.Rojas@colostate.edu

  • Cognitive and Behavioral,
  • Developmental

Portrait of Carol Seger

Carol Seger, PhD

Professor, Department of Psychology

Cognitive neuroscience of human learning, memory, and executive function using functional and anatomical neuroimaging techniques. Our overarching goal is to characterize how distributed networks across the brain support and represent learning and use of new skills, habits, and concepts. We also study the perceptual and cognitive functions of the basal ganglia and corticostriatal networks in healthy adults and those with basal ganglia disorders.
Carol.Seger@colostate.edu

  • Cognitive and Behavioral

Portrait of Jacyln Stephens

Jaclyn Stephens, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy

Evaluates adolescents and young adults with sports-related concussion (SRC) and more severe traumatic brain injuries (TBI) using behavioral measures and neuroimaging techniques, like electroencephalography (EEG), functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Overarching goal of improving evaluation of SRC and TBI, so individuals can return to meaningful occupations without risk of new, secondary injuries like repeat concussions.
Jaclyn.Stephens@colostate.edu

  • Neurodegeneration and Disease

Portrait of Michael Tamkun

Michael Tamkun, PhD

Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences

Molecular and cell biology of voltage-gated Na+ and K+ channels in nerve and muscle. Ion channel biology is studied using a variety of molecular, biochemical and cellular techniques, including voltage-clamp, live cell imaging and single molecule tracking.
Michael.Tamkun@colostate.edu

  • Cellular and Molecular

Portrait of Glenn Telling

Glenn Telling, PhD

Professor, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology

While we are particularly recognized for our work on transgenic mouse modeling of prion diseases, our group is one of only a handful with the resources and expertise for studying prion diseases using whole animal, transgenic, cell biological, biochemical, and molecular genetic approaches. This places us in a unique position to investigate the molecular events underlying prion propagation, species barriers and strains, which remain the overarching goals of my research program.
Glenn.Telling@colostate.edu

  • Cellular and Molecular,
  • Neurodegeneration and Disease

Portrait of Michael Thomas

Michael Thomas, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology

Our laboratory is concerned with interpretive and statistical challenges relevant to neuropsychological research and practice. We rely on methods and tools from psychometric theory, cognitive psychology, and neuroscience to conduct our research. Recent work seeks to develop computerized adaptive tests to improve the collection and interpretation of cognitive and brain imaging data. Other studies are aimed at better understanding the mediating processes involved in the development, maintenance, and remediation of cognitive dysfunction. A wide range of populations are studied, but we have a particular interest in schizophrenia, aging, and dementia.
Michael.L.Thomas@colostate.edu

  • Cognitive and Behavioral

Portrait of Ronald Tjalkens

Ronald Tjalkens, PhD

Professor, Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences

Research projects focus on the role of glial cells in neurodegeneration, neuroinflammatory signaling in Parkinson’s disease, astrocyte biology and calcium signaling, and mitochondrial dysfunction related to oxidative stress. Projects emphasize multi-dimensional fluorescence imaging, molecular approaches to modulate gene expression in neural cells, and the use of transgenic models.
Ron.Tjalkens@ColoState.edu

  • Circuits and Systems,
  • Neurodegeneration and Disease

Portrait of Susan Tsunoda

Susan Tsunoda, PhD

Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences

We use Drosophila as a model to study: how voltage-gated K+ channels are trafficked/targeted, how their biophysical properties are regulated, how expression and function of channels are regulated by activity, and the role K+ channels play in excitability and synaptic function. We combine electrophysiology, imaging, genetics, and molecular and cell biological techniques.
Susan.Tsunoda@ColoState.edu

  • Cellular and Molecular,
  • Neurodegeneration and Disease

Portrait of Jozsef Vigh

Jozsef Vigh, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences

We focus on synaptic mechanisms underlying retinal visual information processing and light-driven behavior in vertebrates. Approaches based on patch clamp electrophysiology, in combination with pharmacological techniques and behavioral studies.
Jozsef.Vigh@ColoState.edu

  • Cellular and Molecular,
  • Sensation and Perception

Portrait of Mark Zabel

Mark Zabel, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology

Prion immunology, biochemistry and ecology.
Mark.Zabel@ColoState.edu

  • Cellular and Molecular,
  • Neurodegeneration and Disease

Affiliate Faculty

Portrait of John Walrond

John Walrond, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences

Structure and Function of central and peripheral nicotinic cholinergic synapses.
John.Walrond@ColoState.edu

  • Cellular and Molecular,
  • Circuits and Systems

Portrait of Ray Whalen

Ray Whalen, DVM

Department of Biomedical Sciences

Interactive multimedia educational programs.
Ray.Whalen@ColoState.edu


Portrait of Wen Zhou

Wen Zhou, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Statistics

High dimensional inference, statistical machine learning, multivariate time series, graphical and network models, neural network, genomics and connectomics.
riczw@stat.colostate.edu

  • Computational

Emeritus Faculty

Portrait of James Bamburg

James Bamburg, PhD

Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Role of the cytoskeleton and associated proteins in neurodegenerative disorders, particularly the formation of cofilin-actin rods. Application of mouse genetics, neuronal and brain slice culture, biochemical, molecular biological, computer-enhanced microscopy & ultrastructural methods
James.Bamburg@colostate.edu

  • Cellular and Molecular,
  • Neurodegeneration and Disease

Contract and Continuing Faculty

Portrait of Barbara Bernstein

Barbara Bernstein, PhD

Senior Research Scientist, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

The neuronal cytoskeleton; regulation and role of actin microfilaments in growth, synaptic transmission, and cell survival. Protein biochemistry, tissue culture, and a variety of optical imaging techniques are used.
bwb@colostate.edu

  • Cellular and Molecular

Portrait of Philip Quirk

Philip Quirk, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences

Regulation and function of ligand-gated ion channels.
Philip.Quirk@colostate.edu

  • Cellular and Molecular

Portrait of Leslie Stone-Roy

Leslie Stone-Roy, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences

Sensory substitution and sensory perception in response to electrotactile stimulation in collaboration with the Department of Mechanical Engineering
Leslie.Stone-Roy@colostate.edu

  • Computational,
  • Sensation and Perception